What pathway did you take to find this blog post? Unless you navigated here through the Main Path homepage, you probably typed something into a search engine and was directed to this article. The search you typed in included keywords and those keywords helped the search engine identify what you were looking for.

Keyword data can be found through a variety of tools, though most use Search Analytics within Google Webmaster tools, or through a paid campaign in Google Adwords. This is valuable information to any team, and can be used in a number of ways, including to optimize your content to further attract traffic and boost conversion rates.

But for bloggers and businesses, are you using those keywords to drive your future content?

Here’s how it works: using analytical tools, take note of the keywords and keyword themes people are most commonly using to find your site. Focus on long-tail keywords or questions that will lend well to a blog post topic. Then develop a content calendar that includes topics that match those words and phrases. Don’t take these keywords and try to fit them into your content unnaturally – instead, use the topics found in your keyword searches to guide what you are blogging about and the structure of your website. Keywords represent your clientele’s desires and curiosities, and creating content that directly responds is a way to virtually cater to their needs.

Using Keywords In Your Content Strategy

As a case study, let’s look at La Mesa RV, one of our clients. La Mesa RV is an American dealership selling new and used RVs across the country.

A search on Google AdWords’ Keywords Planner revealed the top searches for those looking to purchase or sell an RV were phrases such as “RV for sale,” “RV types,” and “RV parts.” Each of these queries yielded more than an average of 27,000 searches each month, with the first garnering up to 90,000 searches in the same time period. The people behind these searches are prospective customers — and now we had a better sense of what they were looking to find out.

From there, we tailored the content to meet those keywords. Whether it was a quiz about what type of RV you are, what to look for when purchasing an RV, or an article about servicing and parts for current RV owners, each of these pieces has been inspired by proactive audience research.

Keyword research can also be done preemptively through the creation of audience personas. Sit down with your team and brainstorm who your target customers are, and the topics that may appeal to them. Narrow in on those topics to make them as specific as possible. Find a niche for your content and then flesh out full content ideas from there.  

You’ve Got Your Content – Now What?

Keyword data can also be helpful when it comes to determining the headline for your article.

One of the factors in search engine rank is how well an article’s headline and content fits what a user has searched. Best practice is to have a keyword in the title and description of an article. Having that keyword at the start of a title tag will work further wonders still. Gathering keyword data will help you be more accurate with the headlines used on your website, which will translate into more search queries landing on your page.

Something important to remember is that content has an expiry date. Whether it’s a call to action that is no longer relevant or a service your business no longer offers, content should be regularly updated. Monitoring keyword data for each individual piece of content will help design articles to match your customer’s needs. Provide calls to action and resources that are responsive to the keywords a user has searched.

While definitely not the only element of search engine optimization, tapping into your keyword information is a guaranteed way to strategically move forward with your content strategy.

 

 

Author Bio: Andrew Lovasz is the CEO of Main Path Marketing, a leading digital marketing firm providing enterprise level solutions to SMB and mid-market companies. He has 17 years of experience as an executive in the digital marketing industry, with clients ranging from Verizon Wireless to thousands of small and mid-market car dealers, restaurants and hotels. Mr. Lovasz won Google’s 2015 SMB Premier Partner Mobile Champion award for his team’s efforts in optimizing digital marketing campaigns for mobile devices. His efforts brought cutting edge online to offline attribution to prove that digital marketing led to increases in real world sales. Most recently he served as the SVP of Marketing Strategy for Search Optics where he focused on driving measurable results for SMB and mid-market companies.

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